Fillet of Sea Bass with Roasted Red Peppers, Feta, New Potato and Rocket Salad

Fillet of Sea Bass with Roasted Red Peppers, Feta, New Potato and Rocket Salad

Ingredients

100g new potatoes, boiled
1 handful of rocket 30g
4 cherry tomatoes, cut in half
10g red onion finely sliced
1 roasted red pepper, sliced into rings (jars are available in most supermarkets)
35g Feta cheese, cut into cubes
40g cucumber, finely sliced
1 x 160g fillet of sea bass, seasoned with salt and pepper
a little olive oil
salt and pepper
balsamic vinegar to drizzle
lemon wedge to garish

First cut your sea bass fillet in half and score the skin. Brush the seasoned sea bass with a little olive oil and grill skin side up for 4-6 minutes, until the skin is coloured and crisp. In the meantime cut the boiled new potatoes into wedges and heat some olive oil in a frying pan over a fairly high heat.

When the oil is very hot, add the potato wedges and sliced roasted red pepper and continue to cook until the wedges are coloured. Remove the red pepper and potato wedges from the pan and allow to rest for one minute.

Next mix the feta, cucumber, red onion, and cherry tomatoes in a bowl with a little olive oil. Add the warm potato wedges and red peppers to the salad and mix through. Put the mixed rocket salad onto a plate and drizzle with some balsamic vinegar. Put the fillet of sea bass on top of the dressed salad and garnish with the lemon wedge.

Matt Johansson, Food and Beverage Manager at The Mussel Inn, in Glasgow and Edinburgh, said: “Eating a seafood diet can help you reduce weight. For years, seafood has been part of many weight loss programmes because it is natural and has many beneficial properties.

“Because seafood is high in beneficial proteins and low on saturated fats, the health benefits of seafood include lowering of cholesterol, lowering the risk of heart disease, lowering the risk of stroke, and building muscle.

“Fish and seafood with higher protein can prevent weight gain naturally, and it is easier to digest. White fleshed fish is lower in fat than any other source of animal protein, and oilier fish contain substantial quantities of omega 3s or the ‘good’ fats in a diet plan.

Most shellfish are low in fat and most seafood provides only 190 calories for a three ounce serving, cooked. For a healthier choice, go for the poached, baked, or grilled fish, rather than fried.

Eating fresh seafood a couple of times a week can provide great health benefits and is a good way to obtain your required dose of essential oils which help prevent Alzheimer’s disease, asthma, arteriosclerosis, bipolar disorder, bronchitis, cancer, heart diseases and more.”